Tickner Writing Fellow

The Reginald S. Tickner Writing Fellowship is an annual writer-in-residence position named in honor of Reginald Tickner, whose 41-year career at Gilman impacted thousands of Gilman students.

Each year, the Tickner Fellow:

  • Directs the Writers at Work Series, a yearly program of bringing writers to campus to give a reading and work with classes for a day.
  • Advises Paragon, the school's award-winning literary magazine, published at least twice each year.
  • Teaches one section of Creative Writing to seniors every other day in addition to leading occasional creative writing projects in other English classes.
  • Consults one-to-one with students on their writing as part of the Tickner Writing Center and in independent study.
  • Uses his/her non-teaching day for activity related to personal writing projects and shares the process with students and faculty.

The Fellows

Ben Kingsley (2017-2018)
Ben Kingsley (2017-2018)

Ben Kingsley is best known for his Academy Award winning role as Mahatma Gandhi. A touch less famous, Benjamin Naka-Hasebe Kingsley has not acted since a third-grade debut as the undertaker in Music Man. He is the recipient of a Provincetown Fine Arts Work Center fellowship as well as scholarships from Kundiman, Sewanee, the Tin House Writer's workshop, & VONA. He belongs to the Onondaga Nation of Indigenous Americans in New York. In 2017, his work will be featured in the Iowa Review, Narrative, Ninth Letter, PANK, PEN America, the Poetry Review, Prairie Schooner, Sugar House, & Water-Stone Review, among others.

Thea Brown (2016-2017)
Thea Brown (2016-2017)

Poet Thea Brown is a graduate of the Iowa Writers' Workshop, where she was named a Truman Capote Fellow. Originally from the Hudson Valley in New York, she has worked with high school students at the Iowa Young Writers' Studio and the Iowa Youth Writing Project. Thea's work has been published in literary journals and collections including American Letters & Commentary; Better, The Volta, Mississippi Review, jubilat, TriQuarterly, and Best New Poets. She is the author of the collection Think of the Danger and the chapbook We Are Fantastic. She most recently taught at George Washington University.

Cam Terwilliger (2015-2016)
Cam Terwilliger (2015-2016)

Cam Terwilliger's fiction and nonfiction can be found online with American Short Fiction, Electric Literature, The Rumpus, and Narrative, where he was named one of Narrative's "15 Under 30." In print, his writing appears in West Branch, Post Road, and The Literary Review, among others. While in residence at the Gilman School, Terwilliger shared with students his progress on a historical novel set in New York and Quebec during the French and Indian War (1756–1763). He conducted research for the book as a Fulbright Scholar at McGill University and at the American Antiquarian Society. His work has also been supported by fellowships and scholarships from the James Jones First Novel Fellowship, the Bread Loaf Writers' Conference, the Sewanee Writers' Conference, the Massachusetts Cultural Council, and the Virginia Center for Creative Arts. A graduate of Emerson College's MFA program, he taught previously at Louisiana State University, Coastal Carolina University, and Grub Street.

Will Schutt (2013-2015)
Will Schutt (2013-2015)

Will Schutt is the author of Westerly, winner of the 2012 Yale Series of Younger Poets prize (selected by Carl Phillips). A graduate of Oberlin College and Hollins University, he is the recipient of fellowships and scholarships from the James Merrill House, the Sewanee Writers' Conference and the Stadler Center for Poetry at Bucknell University. His poems and translations have appeared in Agni, FIELD, The New Republic, The Southern Review and elsewhere. More information can be found at his website: www.wschutt.com.

Adam Prince (2012-2013)
Adam Prince (2012-2013)

Born and raised in Southern California, Adam Prince earned his MFA from the University of Arkansas and his Ph.D. from the University of Tennessee. His award-winning fiction has appeared in The Missouri Review, The Southern Review, and Narrative Magazine, among others. He is married to the poet Charlotte Pence and is serving as the 2012-2013 Tickner Fellow at the Gilman School while at work on a novel that takes place in Jakarta, Indonesia. His first book, a short story collection called The Beautiful Wishes of Ugly Men, has just been published with Black Lawrence Press, an imprint of Dzanc Books. His website is His first book, a short story collection called The Beautiful Wishes of Ugly Men, has just been published with Black Lawrence Press, an imprint of Dzanc Books. His website is adamprinceauthor.com

John Brandon (2011-2012)
John Brandon  (2011-2012)
John Brandon  (2011-2012) was raised on the Gulf Coast of Florida and studied at  University of Florida and Washington University in St. Louis.  He has  published two novels, Arkansas and Citrus County, both  with McSweeney's Press.  For the 2009-2010 school year he was the John  & Renee Grisham Writer-in-Residence at University of Mississippi,  and in 2010-2011 stayed on at Ole Miss as Visiting Writer.  His shorter  work has appeared in Oxford American, ESPN the Magazine, GQ, McSweeney's  Quarterly Concern, Mississippi Review, The New York Times Magazine, and  other places.  During the fall, he writes a blog concerning  Southeastern Conference football for GQ.com.
Laura van den Berg (2010-2011)
Laura van den Berg (2010-2011)
Laura van den Berg was raised in Florida and earned her MFA at Emerson College. Her fiction has appeared in One Story, Boston Review, American Short Fiction, Conjunctions, Best American Nonrequired Reading 2008, Best New American Voices 2010, and The Pushcart Prize XXIV, among others. She is also the recipient of scholarships from the Bread Loaf and Sewanee Writers' Conferences, the 2009 Julia Peterkin Award, and the 2009-2010 Emerging Writer Lectureship at Gettysburg College. Laura’s first collection of stories,What the World Will Look Like When All the Water Leaves Us, published by Dzanc Books in October 2009, was selected for the Barnes & Noble “Discover Great New Writers” Program, longlisted for The Story Prize, and shortlisted for the Frank O’Connor Award.
Josh Weil (2009-2010)
Josh Weil (2009-2010)
Josh Weil is the author of the novella collection The New Valley (Grove, 2009) a New York Times Editors Choice book. His short fiction has been published or is forthcoming in Granta, New England Review, American Short Fiction, Narrative and other journals. He has written non-fiction for such publications as The New York Times, Granta, Glimmer Train, and Poets & Writers. Since earning his MFA from Columbia University, he has received a Fulbright Grant, fellowships and scholarships to Bread Loaf and Sewanee Writers' Conferences, a fellowship to the Virginia Center for the Creative Arts, and the Dana Award in Portfolio.
Meghan Kenny (2008-2009)
Meghan Kenny (2008-2009)
Meghan Kenny holds a B.A. in English from Kenyon College and an MFA in fiction from Boise State University. She has taught writing at Boise State University, for the Idaho Writers in the Schools Program, and for Gotham Writers’ Workshop. She has also worked for the Log Cabin Literary Center in Idaho and taught English in Japan for the JET Program. She spent 2007-2008 living and writing on the coast of northern Peru, and was a 2008 Peter Taylor Fellow at the Kenyon Review Writers’ Workshop. She received the Iowa Review Award for Fiction in 2005, was nominated for a Pushcart Prize in 2007 and has stories published or forthcoming in Sonora Review, The Iowa Review, The Gettysburg Review, Cimarron Review, Bound Off, and The Kenyon Review. She has held artist residencies at La Muse in La Bastide Esparbairenque, France and at Vermont Studio Center. She is working on a novel.
Teddy Macker (2007-2008)
Teddy Macker (2007-2008)
Teddy Macker was raised in Pacific Palisades, California. His work appears in Orion, Antioch Review, New Letters, Seneca Review, The Sun, and elsewhere. He now lives in Carpinteria, California on an old farm.
Shara Lessley (2006-2007)
Shara Lessley (2006-2007)

Shara Lessley is the author of "Two-Headed Nightingale" and her current manuscript entitled "The Explosive Expert’s Wife".. A former Wallace Stegner Fellow in Poetry at Stanford University, her awards include an Artist Fellowship from the State of North Carolina, the Diane Middlebrook Poetry Fellowship from the Wisconsin Institute for Creative Writing, an Olive B. O’Connor Fellowship from Colgate University, and a “Discovery”/The Nation prize. Shara’s poems and essays have appeared in Ploughshares, The Kenyon Review, Threepenny Review, The Southern Review, New England Review and Blackbird, among others. A recipient of scholarships from ArtsBridge and Bread Loaf, Shara holds bachelor’s degrees in Dance and English from the University of California, Irvine, and an MFA from University of Maryland. View Shara's website here.

John Rowell (2004–2006)
John Rowell (2004–2006)

John Rowell is the author of the short story collection "The Music of Your Life," which was named as a spring 2003 Dazzling Debut/Breakout Book at amazon.com, as well as a finalist for the 2004 Ferro-Grumley Prize for Best Fiction Book of the Year. He is also the recipient of fellowships from the MacDowell Colony and the Sewanee Writers Conference. His fiction, essays, and reviews have been featured in such publications as Tin House, Bloom and Show Business Weekly, among others. He is now working on a novel. John remains a member of the Gilman Upper School English faculty, and his the director of the spring musicals.

Adam Chiles (2003–2004)
Adam Chiles (2003–2004)
Adam Chiles (2003–2004) teaches at Northern Virginia Community College. His poems have appeared in Antigonish Review, New Delta Review, Washington Square, Indiana Review, Perihelion, Sycamore Review and Barrow Street and other publications in the United States, Canada and England. He has received two full scholarships to attend the Bread Loaf Writers conference in 1998 and 1999 and was a finalist for the 2000 Pablo Neruda Award and the 2002 Ruth Lilly Poetry Fellowship. He was also a semi-finalist for the Discovery/“The Nation” Award, and was nominated for a Pushcart Prize. Adam's first book will be released in summer 2008 (published by a UK press) and will be launched in the UK at the Chester Writers Festival in October 2008.
Maud Casey (2002-2003)
Maud Casey (2002-2003)
Maud Casey lives in Washington, D.C. and teaches at the University of Maryland, where she is the Associate Director of the Program in Creative Writing. She is the author of two novels, The Shape of Things to Come, a New York Times Notable Book of the Year, and Genealogy, a New York Times Editor’s Choice.

Casey is also the author of a collection of stories, Drastic. Twice nominated for Pushcart Prizes, her stories have appeared in The Threepenny Review; The Gettysburg Review; Prairie Schooner; Forklift, Ohio; American Short Fiction; Bellevue Literary Journal; The Salt Hill Journal and elsewhere. She has received residency fellowships from the Ledig International Writers House, Fundacion Valparaiso, Vermont Studio Center, and the UCross Foundation. She is the recipient of the 2008 Calvino Prize and 2008-2009 DC Commission on the Arts and Humanities Artist Fellowship.
David Roderick (2001–2002)
David Roderick (2001–2002)
David Roderick and his wife  spent 2008 traveling Florence and Dublin on the Amy Lowell Traveling Scholarship. He is also a Wallace Stegner Writing Fellowship at Stanford University, and he has also been awarded fellowships from the American Antiquarian Society and the Bread Loaf Writers’ Conference. His poetry and fiction have appeared in more than 50 magazines and journals, including The Hudson Review, The Missouri Review, Prairie Schooner, Triquarterly and The Virginia Quarterly. Last year his poetry manuscript, titled Blue Colonial, was runner-up in for the Yale Younger Poets Prize and recently won the American Poetry Review’s book prize and will be published by Copper Canyon Press in September 2006. He currently teaches creative writing at the University of San Francisco and Stanford University.
Mark Trainer (1999–2001)
Mark Trainer (1999–2001)
Mark Trainer is an editor at PBS Interactive. His fiction has appeared in Shenandoah, The Mississippi Review, The Greensboro Review and other journals. He received his MFA from the University of Virginia and has taught at Rhodes College, the Corcoran School of Art & Design and the Portsmouth Abbey School in addition to Gilman. He currently teaches fiction at Goucher College and lives in Washington, D.C
Christopher Sindt (1998–1999)
Christopher Sindt (1998–1999)
Christopher Sindt is an assistant professor of English and director of the MFA Program in Creative Writing at Saint Mary’s College of California. He is the author of the chapbook The Land of Give and Take, and his poetry has appeared in Hayden’s Ferry Review, Nebraska Review, Nocturnes, Swerve and several other literary journals. He serves on the Board of the Directors of the Squaw Valley Community of Writers and the Advisory Board of San Francisco WritersCorps. He has received several awards, including the James D. Phelan Award and residencies at the MacDowell Colony and the Blue Mountain Center. From 1992–1999, he was the Program Director of the Art of the Wild Writing Conference.
Rachel Newcomb (1997–1998)
Rachel Newcomb (1997–1998)
Rachel Newcomb took a different path from her Tickner Fellow colleagues and was awarded a Ph.D in anthropology in 2004. Now an assistant professor of anthropology at Rollins College, she continues to pursue a writing life in fiction and poetry, and has won her first award in the 2004 Society for Humanistic Anthropology’s Ethnographic Fiction Contest. She has enetered a novel to the Amazon Breakthrough Novelist Contest and as of recent earned semifinalist status. Her poetry and fiction have been published in the Baltimore City Paper, Cumberland Poetry Review, The Crucible, Interim, Poem, New Delta Review, International Poetry Review, Clackamas Literary Review, Kennesaw Review and others.
Michael Knight (1996–1997)
Michael Knight (1996–1997)
Michael Knight, assistant professor of English at the University of Tennessee, is the author of a novel, Diving Rod, and two collections of short fiction, "Goodnight, Nobody" and "Dogfight & Other Stories". He lives in Knoxville and directs the creative writing program at the University of Tennessee.
Mary Azrael (1995–1996)
Mary Azrael (1995–1996)
Mary Azrael, poet, teacher, and editor is the author of Victorians, Riddles for a Naked Sailor, and Black Windows, a hand-made book created for the Smith College Rare Book Collection. Her poems have appeared in Prairie Schooner, Calyx, Chelsea, Harpers, Chattahoochee Review, Kansas Quarterly, Poetry Daily and elsewhere. During the past few years, she has been working on the libretto for "Lost Childhood", an opera based on the life of Holocaust survivor Yehuda Nir. American Opera Projects and the New York City Opera have presented unstaged readings of the opera. A full reading took place in New York on May 16–19, 2005. Azrael lives in Baltimore, where she teaches poetry writing at Johns Hopkins University School of Continuing Studies, and co-edits Passager Magazine, a national literary journal featuring the work of older writers.


Reginald S. Tickner did it all at Gilman and did it well. The positions he held cover an unusually wide range of activities in teaching, administration, and coaching. Tickner’s 41-year teaching career at Gilman included service in all three divisions of the School: English teacher and football and wrestling coach in the Upper School 1951-1960; Head of the Lower School 1961-1970; Head of the Middle School 1971-1980; and Assistant Headmaster in the Upper School from 1982 until his retirement in 1992. Tickner’s active participation in the fields of literature and writing and sports inspired thousands of Gilman students to push hard in their chosen fields.

Apply

Gilman School, an independent boys’ school, announces its search to award the 22nd Tickner Writing Fellowship to an emerging poet, playwright, or writer of fiction or creative nonfiction. The Tickner Fellowship will be a two year position beginning in the fall of 2017.

Responsibilities

Responsibilities include teaching one senior elective in creative writing each semester, organizing a series of readings, advising the literary magazine, and working with the Lower and Middle Schools on select writing projects. The Tickner Fellow teaches every other day, affording time for independent writing projects.

Salary: $35,000 per year, plus full benefits package.

Application

To apply: Send a hard copy of your CV, a cover letter, three confidential letters of recommendation, and a writing sample of up to 30 pages of published prose, 10 pages of published poetry, or an original play to:

Mr. Patrick Hastings
English Department Chair
Gilman School
5407 Roland Avenue
Baltimore, MD 21210

Because the 2016/17 search was for a two-year position, we will not be conducting a search in 2017/18.  Gilman will next accept applications in December 2018. We are happy to accept materials, including letters of recommendation, from a dossier service or under separate cover.

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